Winner Announced!

The “Correct Me” contest is over, and I would like to thank everyone who sent in answers, commented privately or gave it a shot. For those who missed out, here is a link to the original article:

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

 

Before announcing a winner, I would like to go through the issues within the original article, highlighting the corrections. For the record, there were 4 typos and 2 grammatical errors in the article.

 

Corrections:

 

  • Paragraph 1: “they” was misspelled.
  • Paragraph 2: needs a semicolon after “important”
  • Paragraph 4: “dry” is misspelled in this context. It should be “dried.” NOTE: While “cut and dry” is sometimes accepted, it is not the most accurate.
  • Paragraph 6: “individuals” was misspelled.
  • First bulleted list: First sentence should be broken after “surreal” and end with “?”
  • Second bulleted list, bullet 2: “editors” should be plural.

 

Notes that need discussing

 

There were several comments here, on FB and in private messages that discussed beginning sentences with a conjunction, implied subject sentences and sentence fragments.

 

While it is true that these are not grammatically correct in certain media, their use is acceptable in certain formats. Both online and in fictional prose, this is acceptable. It is improper in technical documents, academic writing or scientific writing, and it is considered improper in most print media styles.

 

Parenthetical phrases are considered unnecessary in most technical, academic and scientific writing. For instance, in paragraph 3, “in general” is unnecessary. I chose to add it to keep the vibe of the content conversational.

 

Clichés are unilaterally frowned upon in most academic, scientific or media-formatted writing. An example of this can be found in paragraph 3, “all things considered.” Since, clearly, all things have NOT been considered, this phrase is overstated and only used as a cliché. However, the standard forbidding clichés excludes online writing, particularly blog posting.

 

Something I was surprised no one mentioned is my pervasive use of contractions. While wholly acceptable online, it is frowned upon pretty much everywhere else. Similarly, the use of first person pronouns is only acceptable online…and only in certain contexts.

 

One final note before I announce a winner:

 

Because I come from an AP background, I tend to not use the Oxford comma. I realize that the fans of the OxCom are legion…and, to be honest, I accept your position as superior. I’m just not in the habit.

 

Who got what right?

 

Remember, per the rules, I can only count those who posted here in the actual contest. So, while several other folks sent me messages or emails, only those who commented on this blog are eligible.

 

Paragraph 1: “they” was misspelled.

Tina, Lewis, Lori

 

Paragraph 2: needs a semicolon after “important” or split sentences.

Lewis, Jeremy

 

Paragraph 4: “dry” is misspelled in this context. It should be “dried.”

Lewis

 

Paragraph 6: “individuals” was misspelled.

 

First bulleted list: First sentence should be broken after “surreal” and end with “?”

 

Second bulleted list, bullet 2: “editors” should be plural.
Jeremy

 

And, the winner is…

 

Lewis correctly identified 3 items. He even got the one I thought would slip by everybody, the “cut and dry” misspelling.

 

So, Lewis, shoot me message on Facebook and tell me which gift card you prefer: Visa, Cheesecake Factory or iTunes. Or, given your woodworking, you could opt for Home Depot or Lowes. And your address, so I can send it to you.

 

Congratulations, Lewis!

 

And, to everyone, thanks for playing! I plan to do one of these at least twice a year, so keep following or subscribe to my blog to take your shot!

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

%d bloggers like this: